A snapshot of Los Angeles's famously bustling airport. 

Last weekend, architectural photographer Mike Kelley set up shop at Los Angeles International Airport and captured almost every departure from LAX’s south complex.

He then went home to work some Photoshop magic, painstakingly assembling the photos into this one dramatic image:


via Michael Kelley Photography/Facebook 

As Kelley told the Washington Post, he had shot over 370 photos, but the final image is composed of the 75 that together represent a more diverse mix of airlines.
 
On Reddit, Kelley explains that the image included takeoffs from two different runways, which accounts for size and depth differences in the planes. Kelley also writes that he took some “artistic liberty” with the angle of the planes in order to compose a more interesting image -- though this unedited, two-thirds complete version is still quite mesmerizing.
 

(h/t SPLOID)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of high-rises in Songdo, billed as the world's "smartest" city.
    Life

    Sleepy in Songdo, Korea’s Smartest City

    The hardest thing about living in an eco-friendly master-planned utopia? Meeting your neighbors.  

  2. A young man rides a hoverboard along a Manhattan street toward the Empire State Building in New York
    Transportation

    Why Little Vehicles Will Conquer the City

    Nearly all of them look silly, but if taken seriously, they could be a really big deal for urban transportation.

  3. Maps

    Inside the Massive U.S. 'Border Zone'

    All of Michigan, D.C., and a large chunk of Pennsylvania are part of the area where Border Patrol has expanded search and seizure rights. Here's what it means to live or travel there.

  4. Equity

    The Problem with Suburban Police

    The East Pittsburgh police department that is responsible for killing the unarmed teenager Antwon Rose, Jr. is one of more than a hundred police departments across metro Pittsburgh—and that’s a problem.

  5. Equity

    How HUD Could Reverse Course on Racial Discrimination

    The housing agency plans to revisit its rule regarding “disparate impact,” a legal doctrine that prohibits discrimination that happens because of a policy whose language is otherwise neutral.