Some of Garry Winogrand's most compelling images of New York, L.A., and Albuquerque.

Garry Winogrand was one of America's most important postwar photographers. A traveling exhibition by the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art brings his work back to life.

In an exhibit simply titled Garry Winogrand, viewers are treated to a thorough retrospective of his photography, including some of the shots he never got around to printing. (When Winogrand died in 1984, the 56-year-old photographer left behind 6,500 rolls of undeveloped film.)

His work captures an America that wavered from post-WWII optimism to post-Vietnam despair. Born in the Bronx, his early work focuses on an energetic New York City. In the 1970s and up to his death, Winogrand explored the rest of the country, photographing the people and places he discovered in a way that expresses a far gloomier perspective. That despair is especially noticeable in some of his Los Angeles work from the 1980s.

Garry Winogrand is the first retrospective of the former commercial and travel photographer in 25 years. Starting at SFMOMA in 2013, the exhibit is currently at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. until June 8. Manhattan's Metropolitan Museum of Art will host in next, starting June 27.

"Richard Nixon Campaign Rally", New York, 1960 gelatin silver print framed: 45.72 55.88 cm (18 22 in.) Posthumous print made from original negative on the occasion of the Garry Winogrand exhibition organized by the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Left: "Park Avenue", New York, 1959 gelatin silver print overall: 32.7 x 21.7 cm (12 7/8 x 8 9/16 in.) framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) National Gallery of Art, Patrons' Permanent Fund © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Right: Garry Winogrand New York, 1961 gelatin silver print framed: 50.8 40.64 cm (20 16 in.) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"New York World's Fair", 1964 gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Gift of Dr. L.F. Peede, Jr. © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"John F. Kennedy International Airport", New York, 1968 gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) Collection of John and Lisa Pritzker © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"New York", 1968 gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Gift of Dr. L.F. Peede, Jr. © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"New York", 1969 gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) Collection of Jeffrey Fraenkel and Alan Mark © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"Albuquerque, New Mexico", 1958 [1957?] gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"Los Angeles", 1980-1983 gelatin silver print framed: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) The Garry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
"Los Angeles", 1980-1983 gelatin silver print framed: 45.72 55.88 cm (18 22 in.) sheet: 40.64 50.8 cm (16 20 in.) Posthumous print made from original negative on the occasion of the Garry Winogrand exhibition organized by the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

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