One French artist looked up and imagined a whole new world.

While many people find wild things in clouds, French artist Thomas Lamadieu finds a whole world of whimsical characters in the blue sky nestled between buildings.

For the past year, Lamadieu has been transforming patches of empty sky into intricate illustrations. The ongoing series called "SkyArt" will go on exhibit early next month in Hong Kong, as part of "Le French May," an annual festival of cultural exchange.

In some of his more recent work shown below, Lamadieu’s characters settle into the urban architecture of Germany, Canada, Belgium, and France. 

Brussels, Belgium 
Montreal, Canada 
Montreal, Canada 
Marburg, Germany
Marburg, Germany
Hamburg, Germany
Hamburg, Germany
Paris, France

All images courtesy of Thomas Lamadieu

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