Associated Press

Using 1,400 LED lights.

Dr. Frank Lee is an artist, and Philadelphia's Cira Center is his canvas. It was on the side of this 29-story building last year that Lee created a huge game of Pong to celebrate Philly Tech Week. It was later certified as the world's largest architectural video game display by the Guinness World Records.

For this year's festivities, Drexel University's associate professor of game design decided to up his game a bit and create what could be the world's largest game of Tetris. Lee used the 1,400 LED lights embedded in the building's face to create the game. The project used two faces of the skyscraper, making it, Lee said, twice as big as his Pong game.

Here's how it turned out:



Though the screen was huge, the resolution of the game itself, Drexel University's Gaylord Holder told the New York Times, was quite small: "Most people's phones have a higher resolution than the building that we're working with."

Sure, but it's a lot cooler to play Tetris on a building than on a phone.

This isn't the first time Tetris has been played on the side of a building, by the way: MIT did it in 2012 and Brown University did it in 2000. In June, Tetris will turn 30.

This post originally appeared on The Wire. More from our partner site:

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