A magical sight, before it all gets washed away.

We’ve seen plenty of extraordinary 3D chalk drawings on sidewalks. Now, a group of artists from New Zealand are taking the concept to the beach.

The imaginative team, led by Jamie Harkins, David Rendu, and Constanza Nightingale. has been turning Mount Maunganui Beach in northern New Zealand into a wonderland of space-warping spectacles. 

Of course, all the hard work disappears when the tide rolls in at the end of the day. But as Harkins told The New Zealand Herald, he kind of likes the transience. 

Here's a look at some of their work -- see more photos on the group's Facebook page

All images via 3DSD on Facebook.  

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  2. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  3. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  4. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  5. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.