Unusually retro shots of life in New York City.

These days, Instagram offers a wide array of filters through which even the most casual of photographers can alter their snapshots of the city. But professional photographer David Friedman recently unearthed a set of decade-old photos taken with a decidedly more retro vibe: the short-lived Game Boy Camera.

The Nintendo accessory, which once held the Guinness title as the world's smallest digital camera, took black and white digital images, saving up to 30 at any given time. Playing around with how he could get color images out of this simple device, Friedman took it out for a spin in midtown Manhattan in 2000. Take a look below at some of these unusual images of New York, with the photos, Friedman notes on his blog Ironic Sans, "scaled up to 200% for visibility on our fancy modern displays."

There's a view of Rockefeller Plaza:

The outside of the New York Public Library:

Park benches:

Subway riders:

And even a proto-Selfie:

Check out the rest on Friedman's blog.

All images courtesy David Friedman (h/t Kotaku).

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