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Taking the guesswork out of flying. 

It’s a terrible feeling to finally arrive at the airport, only to be hit with the awful surprise that your luggage is overweight.

French industrial designer Selma Durand has come up with a simple way to warn you of this before you leave for the airport -- no bathroom scale required.

Durand’s prototype for a "weighing handle" uses a non-linear spring that can read up to 25 kg. The spring, inserted into the handle, stretches a few millimeters when the bag is lifted. An exterior meter indicates whether the suitcase exceeds 20 or 23 kg, which are common airline weight restrictions.

Here’s a demo.

(h/t Designboom)

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