From empanadas to ratatouille.

Jumping off U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama’s mission to make American school lunches healthier, the Associated Press thought it’d be interesting to see exactly what sort of lunches are being served to kids around the world.

Earlier this week, the AP sent photographers to schools in 13 different countries to check out what students ate for lunch. The results, not surprisingly, reveal a wide spectrum of foods and manners of serving them.

Take a look.

Mirror Lake Elementary School in Federal Way, Washington, USA (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) 
Bahria Foundation school in Rawalpindi, Pakistan (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)
A government school on the outskirts of Jammu, India (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Nablus, West Bank ((AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
Delcare Edu Center, a local kindergarten and child care center in the business district of Singapore. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)
A student's lunch box brought from home in Quito, Ecuador. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
Angela Landa elementary school in Old Havana, Cuba (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
London, England (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
The Chiquitin kindergarten in Madrid, Spain (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
El Caminet del Besos kindergarten in Barcelona, Spain (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
The Anne Franck school in Lambersart, France (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
Buenos Aires, Argentina (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
A snack on the way to school in Bamako, Mali -- most students return home in the middle of the day for lunch. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
Jakarta, Indonesia (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

About the Author

Jenny Xie
Jenny Xie

Jenny Xie is a fellow at CityLab. 

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