Belatchew Arkitekter

Stockholm designers want to get everybody eating crickets from giant "vermin farms" by 2018.

Some people might mentally retch that the United Nations, believing the world's population could hit 9 billion by 2050, thinks we should prepare to eat bugs.

Not the folks at Sweden's Belatchew Arkitekter, though: They want to fast-track the insect-munching. Thus they've whipped up plans to build "vermin farms" upon Stockholm's major intersections, so that by 2018 everybody in the city will be guaranteed plentiful rations of six-legged foodstuffs.

Their official name for these unconventional farms are "Buzz Buildings," presumably for the pleasant hum the millions of crickets will add to the urban soundscape. Looking like big, inflated doughnuts with sunlit gardens inside, there would be nine of them total—and if you think Belatchew hasn't done the math on whether that's enough protein for the people, you've got another thing coming:

Stockholm is expected to have 940,700 inhabitants by the year 2018. in order to make food from bugs corresponding to the inhabitants’ meat consumption, about 500,000 m² of farmable surface is needed. by placing vermin farms in nine roundabouts throughout the city, the goal of making it self-sufficient in protein can be obtained. 

As seen in this very large infographic, the architects believe their bevy of entomophagical installations operating at 50 percent efficiency could provide 489,350 square meters of cricket space, leading them to conclude, quote, "YES, WE CAN!"

A side benefit of these breeding chambers would be their attraction to other beneficial insects, namely honeybees, they allege. Ninety-eight out of 300 species of Swedish wild bees are endangered. The walls of the Buzz Buildings are perforated to allow bees to crawl in and zip among flowers, and with luck not sting the farmers who are trying to corral a bunch of hopping crickets.

Here's hoping the good citizens of Stockholm get this bold plan off the ground by 2018. That way, they can tell the rest of the world what it's like to subsist off of insectoid infrastructure:

It's hard to tell from this cross section, but the bottom floor of each bug barn is meant to have a restaurant serving up heaping bowls of fresh-cooked crickets. The architects explain that "in contrast to the hidden processes of meat, the project invites the public to observe and participate, offering accessible knowledge about where their food comes from":

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    At Atlanta’s Rail Stations, a Transit-Oriented Soccer League Takes Shape

    Swaths of empty space at train stations are being turned into athletic fields for kids and adults.

  2. Life

    Uber, but for Driving Your Kids Around

    A slew of small companies have launched in recent years, offering parents a way to outsource their daily driving.

  3. Design

    Lisbon’s Beautiful, Dangerous Sidewalks

    The artistic and slippery “Portuguese pavement” has become Lisbon’s calling card. City Hall wants to replace a few stretches of them with concrete—a seemingly sensible decision that has sparked outrage.

  4. Transportation

    Beverly Hills Has Financed Its Metro Fight With $13 Million In Local Taxes

    Instead of reconstructing aging school facilities, the district is using a voter-backed ballot measure to pay for a legal campaign against a subway extension.

  5. Life

    How Manhattan Became a Rich Ghost Town

    New York’s empty storefronts are a dark omen for the future of cities.