MYBELL/Kickstarter

When a simple "ding" is not enough.

"Why should we be limited to traditional bells and lights?" ask the makers of MYBELL. Yes, why can't we instead have a bike horn that hollers at 100-plus decibels, "GET OUTTA THE ROAD, YA JACKASS," because isn't that what some inattentive people deserve?

OK, so I can't find anything in MYBELL's promotional material suggesting that cyclists use it to terrorize drivers and pedestrians with withering, self-recorded burns. But c'mon, the way the product's name is formatted in ALL-CAPS? It's basically telling you to fill it up with incendiary messages – perhaps "MOVE IT OR LOSE IT, CHUMP."

As noted by the good folks at Urban Velo, the way this alleged "world's first customizable digital bike horn" works is simple: You plug it into your computer via a USB cord and load it with two personally selected sound files. The first, accessible with one tap of the bell's button, will be a loud, blaring tone for moments of emergency. (The MYBELL team used a locomotive's horn.) The second is activated with two taps and should be milder, to let people know you're trying to pass, for instance, or simply to put a smile on a kid's face by having your bike cluck like a duckling.

Rounding out the package are programmable LEDs that flash in the angry-red sequence of your choosing.  I would suggest Morse code for "HEY, I'M RIDIN' HERE!"

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of Los Angeles in 1962
    Transportation

    Mapping the Effects of the Great 1960s ‘Freeway Revolts’

    Urbanites who battled the construction of the Interstate Highway System in the 1960s saved some neighborhoods—but many highways did transform cities.

  2. a photo of a small fleet of electric Chevrolet Bolts cars.
    Transportation

    Should Electric Vehicle Drivers Pay Per Mile?

    Since EV drivers zip past gas taxes, they don’t contribute to the federal fund for road maintenance. A new working paper tries to determine whether plug-ins should pay up.

  3. A man and a woman shop at a modern kiosk by a beach in a vintage photo.
    Design

    Why Everyday Architecture Deserves Respect

    The places where we enact our daily lives are not grand design statements, yet they have an underrated charm and even nobility.

  4. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  5. A crowded street outside in Boston
    Life

    Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

    A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

×