@theprintersrow/Twitter

A public art project invites you to have a seat on outsized versions of tomes linked to the city.

The streets of London have transformed into a book lover’s paradise thanks to a new public art project that celebrates the city’s rich literary heritage.

Books about Town," a collaboration between the U.K.’s National Literacy Trust and public art organization Wild in Art, officially launched last week, scattering 50 unique “BookBench” sculptures all over the city.

Cleverly shaped like an open book, each BookBench offers residents and visitors an inspired spot to take a breather this summer—and maybe even crack a book there. Designed by professional illustrators and local artists, the benches represent well-known books and stories associated with London—from children’s favorites like Peter Pan and The Wind in the Willows to popular adult titles like Great Expectations and Bridget Jones’s Diary.

The project website also offers detailed background on each bench, artist profiles, and trail maps for tracking down BookBenches and other cultural sites. All of the BookBenches will be auctioned off to the public in October.

Here’s a look at some BookBenches now hanging around London.

The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde—Art by Trevor Skempton (@liu5tan/Twitter)
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis—Art by Quad Digital Mandii Pope (@liu5tan/Twitter)
James Bond stories by Ian Fleming—Art by Freyja Dean (@liu5tan/Twitter)
Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman—Art by Oliver Dean (@LondonCallingUK/Twitter)
Shakespeare's London—Art by Lucy Dalzell (@Book_Fair/Twitter)
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking—Art by Paraig O'Driscoll (@theprintersrow/Twitter)
1984 by George Orwell —Art by Thomas Dowdeswel(@Lizzie_Chantree/Twitter)
Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding—Art by Paula Bressel (@theprintersrow/Twitter)
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie—Art by Laura Elizabeth Bolton (@theprintersrow/Twitter)
Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby—Art by Sophie Green (@theprintersrow/Twitter)
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame—Art by MIk Richardson (Books about Town/Facebook)

(h/t DesignTaxi)

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