UK artists sail across the Atlantic Ocean crafting works from materials that are destroying the marine ecosystem.

Overfishing, coupled with concerning levels of ocean pollution, is altering the ability of fishermen to bring home a sustainable “daily catch.” In an act of artistic advocacy, a team of artists from the United Kingdom will set sail across the Atlantic Ocean this September, searching for materials hazardous to our marine ecosystems. As gritty fishing vessels continue to pull aboard metals and nets that are incompatible with ocean life, the team of concerned U.K. artists will use the pollution to create an unorthodox display of creativity. In this video, an array of ocean pollution collected off the shores of Brighton, England, is melted down to create the “Sea Chair.”

Courtesy of Juriaan Booij and Studio Swine

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a wallet full of Yen bills.
    Life

    Japan’s Lost-and-Found System Is Insanely Good

    If you misplace your phone or wallet in Tokyo, chances are very good that you’ll get it back. Here’s why.

  2. photo: Masdar City in Abu Dhabi
    Environment

    What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

    At the UN’s World Urban Forum in Abu Dhabi, attendees toured Masdar City, the master-planned eco-complex designed to show off the UAE’s commitment to sustainability.

  3. Design

    How We Map Epidemics

    Cartographers are mapping the coronavirus in more sophisticated ways than past epidemics. But visualizing outbreaks dates back to cholera and yellow fever.

  4. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  5. Equity

    What Mike Bloomberg Got Wrong About Redlining and the Financial Crisis

    Comments about New Deal-era housing discrimination made by presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg echo a familiar narrative about minority homeowners.

×