UK artists sail across the Atlantic Ocean crafting works from materials that are destroying the marine ecosystem.

Overfishing, coupled with concerning levels of ocean pollution, is altering the ability of fishermen to bring home a sustainable “daily catch.” In an act of artistic advocacy, a team of artists from the United Kingdom will set sail across the Atlantic Ocean this September, searching for materials hazardous to our marine ecosystems. As gritty fishing vessels continue to pull aboard metals and nets that are incompatible with ocean life, the team of concerned U.K. artists will use the pollution to create an unorthodox display of creativity. In this video, an array of ocean pollution collected off the shores of Brighton, England, is melted down to create the “Sea Chair.”

Courtesy of Juriaan Booij and Studio Swine

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic

About the Author

Chris Heller
Chris Heller

Chris Heller is a former senior associate editor at The Atlantic.

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