Leading voices from this year's Aspen Ideas Festival. 

At this year's Aspen Ideas Festival, we asked a group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders to predict the future of livable, walkable cities. "If I could have one wish for people who live in cities," says Conservational International's M. Sanjayan, "it's that we find ways to connect back to nature, to remind [people] that nature isn't out there—outside the cities—but right in their homes where they live." Other panelists include Luís Bettencourt, Geoffrey West, Alissa Walker, Jeff Speck, and Jennifer Pahlka.

About the Author

Video
Video

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The Atlantic.

Sam Price-Waldman
Sam Price-Waldman

Sam Price-Waldman is a former senior associate producer for video at The Atlantic.

Nadine Ajaka
Nadine Ajaka

Nadine Ajaka is a former associate producer for video at The Atlantic.

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