Flickr/Wolfgang Staudt

Belgian beer innovation number 68,789,132.

As if Bruges needed another way to seem like a magical fairyland, it's about to get a beer pipeline.

The city council just green-lit Brouwerij De Halve Maan's plans to ferry suds through an underground tube from its center-city brewery to its bottling plant on the outskirts of town.

CEO Xavier Vanneste told Belgium's Het Nieuwsbladsaid (link in Dutch) that the beer's three kilometer (1.86 mile) trip will take 10 to 15 minutes through polyethylene tubes, at a rate of 6,000 liters of beer per hour. The pipeline is expected to take hundreds of delivery trucks off the roads, and its cost will be footed entirely by the brewery.

Paul Gatza, Director of the Brewers Association in the U.S., noted that this is not only an unusual solution, but an unusual problem. It's rare for breweries to operate in a location separate from their bottling facility, since transporting kegs is an added expense. "But in places where there's limited real estate, I can see how that's an option," he said.

He also added that Bruges' pipeline isn't the first he's heard of: Great Lakes Brewing Company in Cleveland uses underground tubes to ferry beer from its brewery to its pub across the street.

May no one ever knock that city ever again.

Top image courtesy of Flickr user Wolfgang Staudt.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a tiny house in Oregon
    Design

    How Amazon Could Transform the Tiny House Movement

    Could the e-commerce giant help turn small-home living from a niche fad into a national housing solution?

  2. A portrait of Jay-Z.
    Equity

    The Roots of Jay-Z’s ‘Black Capitalism’

    Now partnering with the NFL, Jay-Z centers wealth-building in his activism, as many African Americans have before him—but without much success.

  3. Environment

    It's Time to Ditch Paper Straws, Too

    They’re a single-use, disposable consumer item—a greener option, but not a green one.

  4. a photo of a school bus in traffic
    Transportation

    Boston Saved $5 Million by Routing School Buses with an Algorithm

    With 25,000 students and the nation’s highest transportation costs, the Boston Public School District needed a better way to get kids to class.

  5. A photo of a Dayton police office's gun holster
    Equity

    State Preemption of Local Legislation Is Getting Worse

    A new report shows that state legislatures have been expanding their reach in preempting cities from localized regulation on issues like gun control.

×