"The Art of Peeing" is perfect for sending correspondence to somebody you don't like.

Peeing in public: Many have witnessed it, many more have done the dirty deed. And now there's a bold design tribute to the dishonorable act—a drippy font modeled after urine stains on a wall.

"The Art of Peeing" was created by 23-year-old Aravindan Thirunavukarasu using photos of real micturition dribbles. "Those pictures on my website are real pictures which I took after I peed on the wall," emails the New Yorker. "My source of the pee was to drink a lot of gallons of water and I was on a liquid diet for the whole project. I got dehydrated after the project, though. I cleaned up after."

(Art of Peeing)

Such strong lines, such lack of spatter! Not to cast doubt on Thirunavukarasu's authorship, but if these letters did flow from his privates he truly is the Wang Xianzhi of urine calligraphy. "The pee-writing skills I got are because I am from Chennai, India, where I used to pee on the walls to do a lot of 'grappeeti,'" he asserts. "I used to pee on the walls of my city so I thought why not create a font only?"

The typography is available for free (much like pee) and comes in True Type and Open Type formats. It should make a nice present to those who wish to send repellent correspondence to nemeses.

H/t Design Taxi

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