Art Market Budapest

What city wouldn't want to have a furious stone giant ready to rampage through its streets?

You got to hand it to Budapest for deploying a public artwork seemingly designed to make children weep: a humongous, yelling giant, ripping himself out of the ground and ready to rampage through the city.

The alarming visage, which bears a passing resemblance to a furious Michael Chiklis, was made by Ervin Herve-Loranth and the local Gallery Out of Home for the recent Art Market Budapest. Titled "Ripped Up," the sculpture was fabricated from lightweight foam but has the appearance of solid granite; tufts of grass on the head and shoulders enhance the appearance of a massive stone man who's become upset with his underground confinement.

Though he looks ready to throw building-leveling haymakers, the message behind the art is less violent, writes the gallery:

The creation has several meanings, such as the symbolism of freedom, the desire to break free, the curiosity, and the dynamics of development. It can be interpreted as the demonstration of the present situation of the contemporary art scene, or even as it strives to create an urban public communal space.

The gallery adds that the colossus' positioning in a public square guarantees that throngs will "inevitably confront the creation." Here are a few peeks at the monster from Art Market Budapest's Facebook page:

H/t Visual News

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