Art Market Budapest

What city wouldn't want to have a furious stone giant ready to rampage through its streets?

You got to hand it to Budapest for deploying a public artwork seemingly designed to make children weep: a humongous, yelling giant, ripping himself out of the ground and ready to rampage through the city.

The alarming visage, which bears a passing resemblance to a furious Michael Chiklis, was made by Ervin Herve-Loranth and the local Gallery Out of Home for the recent Art Market Budapest. Titled "Ripped Up," the sculpture was fabricated from lightweight foam but has the appearance of solid granite; tufts of grass on the head and shoulders enhance the appearance of a massive stone man who's become upset with his underground confinement.

Though he looks ready to throw building-leveling haymakers, the message behind the art is less violent, writes the gallery:

The creation has several meanings, such as the symbolism of freedom, the desire to break free, the curiosity, and the dynamics of development. It can be interpreted as the demonstration of the present situation of the contemporary art scene, or even as it strives to create an urban public communal space.

The gallery adds that the colossus' positioning in a public square guarantees that throngs will "inevitably confront the creation." Here are a few peeks at the monster from Art Market Budapest's Facebook page:

H/t Visual News

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. animated illustration: cars, bikes, scooters and drones in motion.
    Transportation

    This City Was Sick of Tech Disruptors. So It Decided to Become One.

    To rein in traffic-snarling new mobility modes, L.A. needed digital savvy. Then came a privacy uproar, a murky cast of consultants, and a legal crusade by Uber.

  2. photo: Cranes on the skyline in Oakland, California
    Life

    How to Make a Housing Crisis

    The new book Golden Gates details how California set itself up for its current affordability crunch—and how it can now help build a nationwide housing movement.

  3. photo: bicyclists in Paris during a transit strike in December.
    Transportation

    Paris Mayor: It's Time for a '15-Minute City'

    In her re-election campaign, Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that every Paris resident should be able to meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride.

  4. Stuff

    All Your Favorite British TV Shows, Mapped

    Oh, so that’s where the U.K. version of The Office takes place.

  5. Design

    How We Map Epidemics

    Cartographers are mapping the coronavirus in more sophisticated ways than past epidemics. But visualizing outbreaks dates back to cholera and yellow fever.

×