Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

Actually, the fashion designer used the cause to turn the Grand Palais yesterday into a "demonstration" for Paris Fashion Week.

The revolution will be vogued.

In a city with a rich history of students, minorities, and laborers taking to the streets in protest, Parisians can now say they remember the day dozens of fashion models passionately marched down a fake streetscape in the name of Chanel's 2015 spring/summer collection feminism.

Courageously led by Karl Lagerfeld, who once called Adele "a little too fat" and was sued last year for his comments about "curvy women," the protesters marched down "Boulevard Chanel" (carefully placed puddles be damned) with signs and megaphones in tow.

Never one for a traditional catwalk, Lagerfeld turned the Grand Palais into a Parisian street scene yesterday to show case his new collection during Paris Fashion Week. Last season, he turned the building into a Chanel-themed supermarket.

Despite his previous comments, Lagerfeld did tell Elle UK yesterday that he's "very much into" feminism. More likely, he's responding to a trend. Even in January, the Financial Times had already noted that "feminism is back in fashion." As for the faux streetscape, Lagerfeld told Elle UK it was a reflection of the collection, "it was less fashion—it was more ‘mode de vie’ [clothes for life]. That’s why the street set: no red-carpet dresses, or things like this."

The same man who famously proclaimed "everything I say is a joke" balanced out some of the more serious protest signs with ones said things like "Votez Coco" and "Tweed is better than tweet."

Sous les pavés, la plage!

German designer Karl Lagerfeld appears with model Gisele Bundchen (L, rear) at the end of his Spring/Summer 2015 women's ready-to-wear show for French fashion house Chanel during Paris Fashion Week on September 30, 2014. (Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)
Guests leave Lagerfeld's show. (Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)
(Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)
(Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)
(Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)

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