1AM Gallery

Teeny graffiti gets raised to high art.

Street artists often like to go large, redecorating the sides of buildings and even entire industrial compounds. But in San Francisco they've gone the other way, making model cars and tiny billboards to look like they were attacked by paint-packing mice.

These wonderful miniatures are on display at a new 1AM Gallery show titled "Honey, I Shrunk the Streets." For this laborious act of atomity, the SoMa-based gallery gathered 40 artists from the Bay Area, the East Coast, Europe, and elsewhere to spruce up minuscule brick walls, dumpsters, and other objects provided by a manufacturer of "graffiti toys." (Yes, they exist.) Lovers of street cultureas well as any random nut who likes model trains, ships in bottles, and other shrunken stuff—can check out the show Wednesdays to Saturdays until October 31.

Here are a few shots of the wee artworks, as well as scenes from last week's opening:

Robert Bowen (billboard)
Digital Does (brick wall)
Robert Bowen (truck)
Mark Bode (dumpster)
Pemex (dumpster)
Cameron Van Loos
Cameron Van Loos
Cameron Van Loos

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