"Graffiti's a trade. It's like being a plumber or carpenter."

In this short documentary, journalist Steven Jackson profiles a group of anonymous street artists in Portland, Maine. Graffiti may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Maine—or the second, third, or fourth—but this small, devoted group reveals the complex cocktail of ego, discipline, and deviance behind their trade. "There's a strange feeling about being recognized for something you're doing and still being anonymous," one graffiti artist explains, "that is extremely fucking addictive."

Jackson produced this short while studying at the Salt Institute in Portland. He has also reported on insect wars for NPR,  the mysteries of air travel, and cultural cognition for Psychology Today.

Courtesy of Steven Jackson.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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