Margot Krasojevic

The living quarters are buoyant and float up and down.

Want to be green and also live in the architectural equivalent of an Alex Grey painting? Then perhaps this concept house from Margot Krasojevic is for you: It rises out of the ocean like a twisting mechanical hallucination and runs on the power of waves.

Now is not the time to be building near coastlines, what with sea levels encroaching farther and farther inland. But Krasojevic—the same mind behind this incredibly bizarre "Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison"—has a creative solution for the dousing effects of climate change. While the home's concrete carapace would be anchored to rock, the living quarters are buoyant and would float up and down on the tides.

That doesn't sound too pleasant for anyone prone to seasickness. But chances are, the house's occupants would be too bewildered by their surroundings to even notice the movement. Check out this rendering of what Krasojevic says is the "electromagnetic induction in the courtyard" (but what I suspect is really an intergalactic pipe organ dropped from a UFO):

If Austin Powers went to architecture school, he might've designed this groovy corridor:

And these are not orifice probes but turbines:

Though the house incorporates solar panels, most of its juice seems to come from the ocean in two ways, according to the architect:

the work proposes two types of extruded turbines. the first uses lightweight aluminum chambers, which compress trapped air when a wave breaks into them, creating an electrical current. the second type of sustainable energy uses neodymium magnets to move through wound copper wire tubes, producing a charge as an oscillation pushes and pulls against the extruded chambers with the energy stored in a capacitor. this type of generator is electromagnetically induced.

Behold, more glimpses of the oceanic sustainability-doughnut:

Margot Krasojevic

H/t Designboom

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  2. Transportation

    The Automotive Liberation of Paris

    The city has waged a remarkably successful effort to get cars off its streets and reclaim walkable space. But it didn’t happen overnight.

  3. A small accessory dwelling unit—known as an ADU—is attached to an older single-family home in a Portland, Oregon, neighborhood.
    Design

    The Granny Flats Are Coming

    A new book argues that the U.S. is about to see more accessory dwelling units and guides homeowners on how to design and build them.

  4. A dockless bikeshare bike on the streets of D.C.
    Transportation

    What People Mean When They Call Dockless Bikeshare a 'Nuisance'

    In Washington, D.C., some residents are not enthusiastic about the free-range rent-a-bikes.

  5. Equity

    Women Are Marching Again, But It's Not About Donald Trump

    In its second year, the Women’s March that dominated the nation's capital last January has decentralized, focusing on local issues in cities large and small.