Margot Krasojevic

The living quarters are buoyant and float up and down.

Want to be green and also live in the architectural equivalent of an Alex Grey painting? Then perhaps this concept house from Margot Krasojevic is for you: It rises out of the ocean like a twisting mechanical hallucination and runs on the power of waves.

Now is not the time to be building near coastlines, what with sea levels encroaching farther and farther inland. But Krasojevic—the same mind behind this incredibly bizarre "Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison"—has a creative solution for the dousing effects of climate change. While the home's concrete carapace would be anchored to rock, the living quarters are buoyant and would float up and down on the tides.

That doesn't sound too pleasant for anyone prone to seasickness. But chances are, the house's occupants would be too bewildered by their surroundings to even notice the movement. Check out this rendering of what Krasojevic says is the "electromagnetic induction in the courtyard" (but what I suspect is really an intergalactic pipe organ dropped from a UFO):

If Austin Powers went to architecture school, he might've designed this groovy corridor:

And these are not orifice probes but turbines:

Though the house incorporates solar panels, most of its juice seems to come from the ocean in two ways, according to the architect:

the work proposes two types of extruded turbines. the first uses lightweight aluminum chambers, which compress trapped air when a wave breaks into them, creating an electrical current. the second type of sustainable energy uses neodymium magnets to move through wound copper wire tubes, producing a charge as an oscillation pushes and pulls against the extruded chambers with the energy stored in a capacitor. this type of generator is electromagnetically induced.

Behold, more glimpses of the oceanic sustainability-doughnut:

Margot Krasojevic

H/t Designboom

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