Lor-K

This sofa would really tie an (autopsy) room together.

The people of Paris could be forgiven for thinking there's a serial killer afoot with a severe dislike of furniture. In a Cronenbergian melding of inanimate matter and grisly viscera, chairs, mattresses, and even a toilet have appeared on the city's sidewalks bearing heinous wounds and oozing crimson fluid into the gutters.

These are the disturbing creations of Lor-K, a 27-year-old Parisian artist who's built a bloody volume of work called "Objecticide." (She embarked on the series in 2012, though it's now getting renewed press at Urbanshit.) Lor-K stalked the streets for months looking for abandoned objects. She then went to work with slicing and smashing tools—ripping out stuffing and rending sheet metal—before completing the murder scenes with acrylic and three shades of spray paint to mimic the coagulation of gore.

"I am inspired by our waste, our bins—from what we reject in the city on our own sidewalks," Lor-K emails. "I think they perfectly reflect our consumer society." (What this gruesome art says about her own feelings on consumerism probably isn't good.) Once she finishes a deathly makeover, she'll leave it sitting there to startle pedestrians until some strong-stomached person takes it away. "They are usually picked up by cleaner's men," she says, "or destroyed by curious passers-by."

(Lor-K on Facebook)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. POV

    How Do You Fix the Bus? We Asked the Drivers.

    The people who know buses best have ideas about how to reform the system, according to a survey of 373 Brooklyn bus operators.

  2. A rendering of Elon Musk's Chicago Express Loop, which would transport passengers from downtown to O'Hare in 12 minutes.
    Transportation

    The Craziest Thing About Elon Musk's 'Express Loop' Is the Price

    The $1 billion construction estimate is a fraction of what subterranean transit projects cost.

  3. A stained glass artwork depicting two owls and geometric patterns
    Design

    The Brilliant Artist That Chicago, and the World, Nearly Forgot

    The idiosyncratic art of Edgar Miller (1899-1993) has long been hidden behind closed doors. Finally, Chicagoans are getting more opportunities to see it.

  4. Equity

    D.C.’s War Over Restaurant Tips Will Soon Go National

    The District’s voters will decide Initiative 77, which would raise the minimum wage on tipped employees. Why don’t workers support it?

  5. Life

    Are Americans Fleeing Cities for Suburbs? Not So Fast.

    Basic comparisons of population growth rates don’t tell the whole story, and they misrepresent important questions about where people really want to live.