Freedom/YouTube

To mark the 50th anniversary of the "Red List" of endangered species, a white-tailed eagle with a GoPro captured swooping views of London.

Drone photography already feels sort of passé, right? This year, everyone from Martha Stewart to the very paparazzi that might one day follow her around got into taking overhead shots with their robotic mini-planes.

Much more fresh are these three videos that take the bird's-eye view concept back to its roots. Meaning back to birds. Earlier this month, French falconer Jacques-Olivier Travers mounted a Go-Pro camera to the back of a trusty white-tailed eagle to capture aerial views of London, including the Tower Bridge, St. Paul’s cathedral, and the Olympic park's "Orbit" sculpture.

The videos are part of "Here Today," a exhibition opening next week in London that commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the IUCN Red List, the comprehensive catalogue of the world's most endangered plants and animals. With works from more than 50 artists across disciplines, the exhibition examines the condition of the environment and possible solutions to its ills.

“It’s not all doom and gloom," Dea Flanagan, one of Here Today’s curators, told The Guardian. "We have to celebrate success stories as well.”

White-tailed eagles are one of those. Once listed by the IUCN as "near threatened," reintroduction programs have boosted the Eurasian bird's numbers substantially enough that it's now a species of "least concern."

Which is great news for those of us bored with drone photography. And for the bird's native ecosystem. And for the state of global biodiversity. Go, eagles!

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a highway
    Transportation

    Americans Are Spending Billions on Bad Highway Expansions

    PIRG’s annual list of “highway boondoggles” includes nine transportation projects that will cost a total of $25 billion while driving up emissions.

  2. Rows of machinery with long blue tubes and pipes seen at a water desalination plant.
    Environment

    A Water-Stressed World Turns to Desalination

    Desalination is increasingly being used to provide drinking water around the globe. But it remains expensive and creates its own environmental problems.

  3. Transportation

    America Would Happily Pay Uber An Extra $7 Billion

    Economists put a (big) number on the ride service’s consumer surplus in 2015.

  4. Maps

    The Squirrel Census Answers a Question You Weren’t Asking

    How many squirrels live in New York City's Central Park? Finding the answer was surprisingly complicated.

  5. Design

    What Cities Can Do to Help Birds and Bees Survive

    Pollinators—the wildlife that shuffle pollen between flowers—are being decimated. But they may still thrive with enough help from urban humans.

×