1Week1Project

Each building stone represents one deceased Nepalese migrant worker.

Construction accidents, heat stroke, disease spread by lousy living conditions—these are the things that have killed more than 1,000 migrant workers preparing for Qatar's 2022 World Cup. And with the oil-rich country making little headway with safety reforms, experts forecast the death toll could swell to 4,000 by the time the first soccerball hits the field.

Should all this human destruction go unhonored? The folks at the French/Chilean experimental-architecture concern 1Week1Project think not. They've drafted designs for one of the most gloomy and least-subtle memorials possible: a towering citadel in the middle of the killing desert, made from huge stones that each represent one lost Nepalese worker. (About half of Qatar's World Cup labor force hails from Nepal and India.)

Because more deaths are expected, the lonesome monolith would have a crane on top that could keep stacking body-blocks like a depressing Jenga pillar. In this way, the memorial could eventually tower over Qatar's legion of skyscrapers. Write the architects:

This structure offers Nepalese and Indian families as well as families of other nationalities a site for mourning removed from Qatar’s cities and skyscrapers. The project has a multitude of itineraries for visiting, on a basis of four modules per floor and two staircases per module. The cranes remain positioned in altitude until 2022.

If the death rate is not reduced, the Qatar World Cup Memorial could reach a height of 1.5 kilometers (nearly a mile).

Like 1Week1Project's proposal to convert Brazil's World Cup stadiums into affordable housing, this idea will come to fruition when pigs fly loop-de-loops through the stratosphere. But as a bittersweet response to a terrible real-world situation, it stands on its own:

1Week1Project

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A mural of Woody Guthrie in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
    Life

    Don't Move People Out of Distressed Places. Instead, Revitalize Them

    A new study shows that place-based policies are key to helping people in distressed cities, where investments should be tailored to local economic conditions.

  2. A man rides an electric scooter in Los Angeles.
    Perspective

    Why Do City Dwellers Love to Hate Scooters?

    Electric scooters draw a lot of hate, but if supported well by cities, they have the potential to provide a widespread and beneficial mode of transportation.

  3. People walk along a new elevated park that winds through a historic urban area.
    Equity

    How to Build a New Park So Its Neighbors Benefit

    A new report from UCLA and the University of Utah surveys strategies for “greening without gentrification.”

  4. a map comparing the sizes of several cities
    Maps

    The Commuting Principle That Shaped Urban History

    From ancient Rome to modern Atlanta, the shape of cities has been defined by the technologies that allow commuters to get to work in about 30 minutes.

  5. Life

    How Urban Democrats Became the Most Powerful Force in U.S. Politics

    The 150-year history of how a once-rural party became synonymous with density.

×