A five minute long tour, from the skyscrapers to the streets.

To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of Michael Mann's Heat, filmmaker Gavin Heffernan shot this exhaustive time-lapse of Los Angeles. His camera cuts from distant vantage points of the city's skyline—keep an eye out for the Griffith Observatory!—down to the streets and tunnels that harbor vehicles as they veer through traffic.

Heffernan is something of a time-lapse expert. In a 2012 interview, he explained why he likes the technique: "It's pretty easy to get creatively stifled after a while. I've found that timelapsing and other experimental projects sometimes provide a breath of fresh air from the bureaucracy."

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    Cities Deserve Better Than These Thomas Heatherwick Gimmicks

    The “Vessel” at New York’s Hudson Yards—like so many of his designs—look as if the dystopian world of 1984 has been given a precious makeover.

  2. Homes in Amsterdam are pictured.
    Equity

    Amsterdam's Plan: If You Buy a Newly Built House, You Can't Rent It Out

    In an effort to make housing more affordable, the Dutch capital is crafting a law that says anyone who buys a newly built home must live in it themselves.

  3. A photo of U.S. senators and 2020 Democratic Party hopefuls Cory Booker and Kamala Harris
    Equity

    Cory Booker and Kamala Harris Want a Monthly IRS Tax Credit for Rent

    The 2020 Democratic Party hopefuls are both planning bills that would create a tax credit for housing rental assistance every month. How would that work?

  4. Transportation

    China's 50-Lane Traffic Jam Is Every Commuter's Worst Nightmare

    What happens when a checkpoint merges 50 lanes down to 20.

  5. A photo of a police officer guarding the New York Port Authority Bus Terminal.
    Perspective

    The Troubling Limits of the ‘Great Crime Decline’

    The fall of urban violence since the 1990s was a public health breakthrough, as NYU sociologist Patrick Sharkey says in his book Uneasy Peace. But we must go further.