A five minute long tour, from the skyscrapers to the streets.

To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of Michael Mann's Heat, filmmaker Gavin Heffernan shot this exhaustive time-lapse of Los Angeles. His camera cuts from distant vantage points of the city's skyline—keep an eye out for the Griffith Observatory!—down to the streets and tunnels that harbor vehicles as they veer through traffic.

Heffernan is something of a time-lapse expert. In a 2012 interview, he explained why he likes the technique: "It's pretty easy to get creatively stifled after a while. I've found that timelapsing and other experimental projects sometimes provide a breath of fresh air from the bureaucracy."

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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