A five minute long tour, from the skyscrapers to the streets.

To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of Michael Mann's Heat, filmmaker Gavin Heffernan shot this exhaustive time-lapse of Los Angeles. His camera cuts from distant vantage points of the city's skyline—keep an eye out for the Griffith Observatory!—down to the streets and tunnels that harbor vehicles as they veer through traffic.

Heffernan is something of a time-lapse expert. In a 2012 interview, he explained why he likes the technique: "It's pretty easy to get creatively stifled after a while. I've found that timelapsing and other experimental projects sometimes provide a breath of fresh air from the bureaucracy."

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.

  4. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  5. Transportation

    How to Pedestrianize a Vital Urban Street

    London’s plans for Oxford Street show that even the busiest roads can ban vehicles—but there's one major misstep.