Yener Torun

A local architect uses his camera to showcase the colorful side of one of the world's oldest cities.

Yener Torun sweats the small stuff when it comes to buildings, even when he's just taking a photo of one.

An architect in Istanbul for 14 years now, Torun started his own minimalist photography project on Instagram last year (@cimkedi) after noticing how adept the photo-sharing service was in bringing minute details of simple buildings to life. With a style that arranges people, colors, and shapes so flawlessly, it's hard not to stop and double tap on every Torun photo that appears on your feed.

"What I show is completely abstracted from the reality," says Torun, who doesn't think of his work as architectural photography. "With the human element, the background becomes a tool that shows a feeling or emotion."

Most of Torun's modern scenes come from the very ancient city in which he lives. He has a clear preference for industrial buildings, schools, malls, or public housing towers, and he often ends up in the the business districts of Kavacık, Merter, and Cevizlibağ, or the residential areas of Beylikdüzü, Kurtköy, and Maltepe.

When asked if he has a favorite new building in Istanbul, Torun says it'd probably be the Akel Business Center in Kavacık for its bold use of color; "I've already posted four different pictures of it on Instagram."

A public school in Gayrettepe, Besiktas District.
An office building in Kavacık, Beykoz District.
A store in Avcilar, Avcilar District.
A hotel in Esenyurt, Esenyurt District.
A Hotel in Fındıkzade, Fatih District.
A shopping mall and office building in Cevizlibağ, Zeytinburnu District.
An office building in Kartal, Kartal District.
Social housing building in Maltepe, Maltepe District.
An apartment building in Fulya, Şişli District.
A shopping mall in Mecidiyeköy, Şişli District.

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