After a long journey, a famed urban artist gets his work launched into orbit.

Is it considered street art if it's whizzing high above the streets at 4.76 miles per second? Credit one lucky guy for possibly expanding the definition of urban art, now that he has a piece in low-earth orbit on the International Space Station.

Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti tweeted a picture of it yesterday—let's blow up the photo and see if you can spot it:

@AstroSamantha

Ready? Here it is, top left:

Via Invader / ESA-NASA

That would be an Invader original, crafted by the classic video game-obsessed French artist. It turns out he has a friend inside the European Space Agency, and after years of effort, he convinced the organization to accept one of his alien-themed mosaics, subject it to rigorous tests, put it a sealed baggie, and blast it into the stars. The launch occurred in July 2014; it's taken this long for the piece to get glued to a wall in the Columbus module.

The artist, no duh, is enthused. He writes:

I would have never imagined that my Space Invaders project might take me that high. What looked like an unrreachable dream has come true as Space2 is the first space invader ever installed on a spaceship among real astronauts living in zero gravity and with Earth and the universe as a background ! Art, Science, space conquest : a great move!

Helmets off to Invader—and the amazing connections he must have. If you ever want to know if his art is soaring above your city, look for the moving space station on this Atari-style map.

H/t Ekosystem

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: A woman crosses an overpass above the 101 freeway in Los Angeles, California.
    Transportation

    Navigation Apps Changed the Politics of Traffic

    In an excerpt from the new book The Future of Transportation, CityLab’s Laura Bliss adds up the “price of anarchy” when it comes to traffic navigation apps.

  2. Equity

    D.C.’s Vacant Stadium Dilemma

    RFK Stadium is taking up a very desirable plot of federal land in Washington, D.C.—and no one can agree what to do with it.

  3. A view of a Harlem corner.
    Equity

    How Ronald Reagan Halted the Early Anti-Gentrification Movement

    An excerpt from Newcomers, a new book by Matthew L. Schuerman, documents the early history of the anti-gentrification and back-to-the-city movements.

  4. a bike rider and bus riders in Seattle.
    Perspective

    There’s No App for Getting People Out of Their Cars

    “Mobility as a Service” boosters say that technology can nudge drivers to adopt transit and micromobility. But big mode shifts will take more than a cool app.  

  5. Three men wearing suits raise shovels full of dirt in front of an American flag.
    Equity

    How Cities and States Can Stop the Incentive Madness

    Economist Timothy Bartik explains why the public costs of tax incentives often outweigh the benefits, and describes a model business-incentive package.

×