Bartable

Express your love for Bay Area transit by wearing little pieces of it.

Bay Area residents love to hate on BART, what with its strikes and threatened strikes, surreal passenger behavior, and escalators busting because of the "sheer volume of human waste" inside.

But here's proof at least one person appreciates the transit system: a designer dress that took three years and 192 train tickets to put together.

The curious apparel is the work of Oakland's Sean Porter, who stitched it with a sewing machine and see-through thread. To be accurate, the actual crafting only took a few months. The rest of the time Porter was saving up cards with pennies on them from his trips around the Bay.

The lines of the dress were inspired by the shape of the Transamerica Pyramid, according to Bartable. You can kind of see the similarities:

The dress has a companion piece in a series of draping velour ribbons echoing the colors of the BART map. Porter explains more about the commuterish clothing:

Sewing only BART tickets together, I have created a mid-thigh length cocktail dress. I was inspired by the line and design of the BART tickets. The precision in the time of travel is equally inspiring. I wanted to invoke the feeling of precision by tactfully placing each ticket together to create the symmetrical bodice.... Striving to be bold, beautiful, and true, has resulted in the piece in which I have titled, "b'ART."

Locals can check out the dress at Piedmont Fabrics until the end of the month, and everybody else will have to make due with photos:

Bartable

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  2. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  3. Design

    Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

    A different kind of wealth distribution in 17th-century Amsterdam paved the way for its quintessential home design.

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. Design

    Before Paris’s Modern-Day Studios, There Were Chambres de Bonne

    Tiny upper-floor “maids’ rooms” have helped drive down local assumptions about exactly how small a livable home can be.

×