Bartable

Express your love for Bay Area transit by wearing little pieces of it.

Bay Area residents love to hate on BART, what with its strikes and threatened strikes, surreal passenger behavior, and escalators busting because of the "sheer volume of human waste" inside.

But here's proof at least one person appreciates the transit system: a designer dress that took three years and 192 train tickets to put together.

The curious apparel is the work of Oakland's Sean Porter, who stitched it with a sewing machine and see-through thread. To be accurate, the actual crafting only took a few months. The rest of the time Porter was saving up cards with pennies on them from his trips around the Bay.

The lines of the dress were inspired by the shape of the Transamerica Pyramid, according to Bartable. You can kind of see the similarities:

The dress has a companion piece in a series of draping velour ribbons echoing the colors of the BART map. Porter explains more about the commuterish clothing:

Sewing only BART tickets together, I have created a mid-thigh length cocktail dress. I was inspired by the line and design of the BART tickets. The precision in the time of travel is equally inspiring. I wanted to invoke the feeling of precision by tactfully placing each ticket together to create the symmetrical bodice.... Striving to be bold, beautiful, and true, has resulted in the piece in which I have titled, "b'ART."

Locals can check out the dress at Piedmont Fabrics until the end of the month, and everybody else will have to make due with photos:

Bartable

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of the Eiffel Tower with the words "Made for Sharing" projected on it
    Life

    How France Tries to Keep English Out of Public Life

    France has a long history of using official institutions to protect the French language from outside influence. Still, English keeps working its way in.

  2. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

  3. Life

    Staying Afloat on an Island of Wealth

    Each summer on Martha's Vineyard, year-round residents and seasonal workers struggle to find affordable housing amid the island’s luxury real estate.

  4. Maps

    The Map That Made Los Angeles Make Sense

    For generations in Southern California, the Thomas Guide led drivers through the streets of Los Angeles. Now apps do that. Did something get lost along the way?

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×