Can you judge a passport by its color? Passportindex.org

Browse the world's passports by color, country, and most crucially, how many countries citizens can travel to without a visa.

Anyone who's lucky enough to claim citizenship in the United States shouldn't forget to count among their (many, many) privileges the unique position of holding a U.S. passport, which allows travelers to visit 147 countries visa-free. In practical terms, that means international travel is both cheaper and easier than it is for citizens of (many, many) other countries.

For a visual reminder of this fact, check out Passportindex.org, which offers "power rankings" for each global passport calculated by tallying a country's "visa-free score," or how many countries holders can visit without either an advance visa or by purchasing a visa on arrival. By this measure, the U.S. passport holds a No. 1 ranking, along with the U.K., Sweden, Germany, and Finland.

(Passportindex.org)

The index can be viewed several ways: by country, by location, by rank, and—most fun but possibly least useful—by color. Browse the reds, greens, blues, and blacks of worldwide travel documents, then click for stats on restrictions for holders of that passport. Gabon, on the West Coast of Central Africa, has a black cover featuring a breastfeeding mother—and a power rank of 73, with only 44 countries travelable to without a visa. Guatemala, with a blue cover, is emblazoned with a handy map of the country's location within the rest of Central America. It has a power rank of 35, with 98 countries not requiring a visa.

(Passportindex.org)

At GOOD Magazine, Ricky Linn also has a nice infographic based on the same U.S. State Department data that shows the rights of passport holders all over the world, graded by color.

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