Artist Gregos has plastered cities with more than 1,000 pseudo-Gregoses.

Gregos. Gregos. Gregos. Learn this man’s name now, because chances are if you’re in Europe you’ll be running smack into a simulacrum of his puckered face.

Gregos is an urban artist from Paris who’s slowly, doggedly plastering cities with models of his mug. Some are frowning, others wincing as if on the toilet, others jutting out their tongues. “Each face is a sort of self-portrait of the day to express his humors, his past, present, and future, everything that makes Gregos,” Gregos writes. “As of today, more than 1,000 faces have been installed, in Paris mostly, but also in other towns of France and of the world.”

Gregos is so determined to spread Gregos he’s selling little versions of his face for fans to hang in their burgs. (The sculpture titles range from “The Kiss” to “The Sadness” to “The Pain.”) As there’s not much more to say about this hilariously self-centered pursuit, let’s just dive into some of the Gregoses and Gregos appreciators out there:

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