London Design Festival

That doesn’t look safe.

If an angry colossus were to pick up a 115-foot-tall electric tower and spike it into the ground lawn-dart style, you’d have the newest piece of large-scale public art planned for London.

“A Bullet from a Shooting Star” will rise this September in Greenwich Peninsula as part of the annual London Design Festival. British artist Alex Chinneck is making the topsy-turvy pylon—and he’s got the skills for it, considering his last illusion also involved an upside-down object (in that case a Corsa hatchback).

The tower will use some 3,300 feet of steel and is likely to weigh upward of 15 tons. Given its insecure appearance, will some fun-loving teenager be able to push it over and crush a house? Unlikely, given its anchors reach more than 60 feet below earth. Here’s more from the design fest:

Referencing the industrial history of the site which once included the largest oil and gas works in Europe and a steelworks, Chinneck will create a lattice of steel, that resembles an upside down pylon, leaning at a precarious angle as though shot into the earth. The construction and materials will reflect the same visual and material language of multiple structures across the Peninsula, particularly the redundant gas tower located on site while also evoking the idea of power generation and supply.

The 35-metre high structure has been designed to be seen from a distance, and can be viewed from North Greenwich Station, the Emirates Airline cable car, the Thames Clipper service, Canary Wharf and all planes that fly to and from City Airport. Illuminated at night, the work acts as a literal beacon and will project a maze of latticed shadows.

London Design Festival

H/t It’s Nice That

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