Rendering for 217 W. 57th Street, soon to be the tallest building in the nation. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill

The newly revealed design for the Nordstrom Tower will make it the highest in the Western Hemisphere.

When plans first emerged for New York City’s Nordstrom Tower, it was plain that its designers meant to defer to One World Trade Center. At 1,775 feet in height, the new supertall designed by Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill fell just one foot shy of the record for the tallest building in the city (and the nation). Second place was no consolation prize: The building would still take the title for the tallest residential tower in the world.

Now the Nordstrom Tower is rising even higher. New York Yimby has the scoop on new diagrams that show a height of 1,795 feet for 217 W. 57th Street. Set down that crown on the ground, 1 WTC: When it is finished, Nordstrom Tower will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere.

This development puts to rest some debate over whether One World Trade Center is truly the tallest building in the nation. (The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat ruled in 2013 that the Freedom Tower’s spire would count toward its official height, giving New York the nod over Chicago and its Willis Tower in a skyscraper competition dating back years.)

The newly revealed design scheme for the Nordstrom Tower gives it a parapet height and pinnacle height taller than those for One World Trade Center—so it won’t be taller by a technicality. It will just be taller. The tallest. And once construction is complete, the condos could set some other records as well. For steepest price ever paid for a penthouse, for example, or lowest effective property tax rate ever set on a home in New York City. But those figures remain to be seen.

(New York Yimby)

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