A rendering of "Fata Morgana." Mad. Sq. Art

It’s like time stopped during a carnival-funhouse explosion.

Love public art that makes reality seem fracturing into hundreds of shards? Then run on down to New York’s Madison Square Park, where everything’s been festooned with floating, disorienting mirrors.

Local artist Teresita Fernández has hung 500 feet of reflective fragments over the park’s pathways, creating illusions of time freezing during a carnival-funhouse explosion. The installation, which officially debuted on Monday, is called Fata Morgana after a type of mirage that appears on the horizon. The people at Mad. Sq. Art explain more:

The metal forms, perforated with intricate patterns reminiscent of foliage, will create abstract flickering effects as sunlight filters through the canopy, casting a golden glow across the expanse of the work, paths, and passersby….

Fata Morgana is a site-specific work designed for, and inspired by, Madison Square Park,” said Ms. Fernández. “My concept was to invert the traditional notion of outdoor sculpture by addressing all of the active walkways of the Park rather than setting down a sculptural element in the Park’s center. By hovering over the Park in a horizontal band, Fata Morgana becomes a ghost-like, sculptural, luminous mirage that both distorts the landscape and radiates golden light.”

The project did not have a 100 percent-smooth road to realization. Certain neighbors are “furious” that it will partly block the sky over its nine-month run, reports DNAinfo, which quotes a fuming dog walker: “It’s huge, it’s enormous, and it also looks like they’re building a shelter. This is ridiculous.” But let’s see if those people sing the same tune during the blistering, shirt-drenching heat of September.

Raindrops & Art #madisonsquarepark #art

A photo posted by Alireza (@monsieurgris) on

Cuz sometimes you just need an artful mirror in the sky :) #madisonsquarepark #latergram

A photo posted by Arjun Gupta (@arjunguptabk) on

A rendering of 'Fata Morgana.' (Mad. Sq. Art)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a rendering of the moon village with a view of Earth
    Design

    Designing the First Full-Time Human Habitat on the Moon

    SOM, in partnership with the ESA and MIT, wants to accommodate research and maybe even tourism on the moon.

  2. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  3. South Lake Union streetcar with an advertisement for Amazon passes by an Amazon office building.
    Equity

    Amazon’s Slow Retreat From Seattle

    Amazon has long fancied itself an urban enterprise. Is its pivot to smaller communities a way to avoid messy politics?

  4. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  5. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.