A rendering of a proposed wildlife crossing over Denver’s I-70. Janet Rosenberg, Associates Inc.

Oslo’s new “bee highway” is just one part of an emerging trend in highway infrastructure.

Oslo has taken a decidedly adorable stand in the battle to save pollinators, with its new “bee highway. Homeowners, businesses, and local officials have rallied to support the endangered insects by planting local flowering plants in yards, planters, parks, and on rooftops. Some spots are formal constructions, offering beehives or bee “hotels,” while others are simple gardens.

“The idea is to create a route through the city with enough feeding stations for the bumblebees all the way,” one member of the Oslo Garden Society told local press in May. “Enough food will also help the bumblebees withstand man-made environmental stress better.”

Amateur beekeeper Marie Skjelbred stands next to her beehive on the 12th floor of a building in Oslo on June 11, 2015. (Phys.org)

There doesn’t seem to be a way of tracking whether the bees in Oslo are indeed using the waystations to enter and exit the city, as the “highway” moniker implies. But the project does tie into an increasingly popular, if not entirely new, approach to protecting larger animals passing through built environments: wildlife crossings. Starting in the 1950s, France, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands and other European countries have built bridges, culverts, and underpasses designed specially for animals so they can safely traverse busy human highways.

Often shaped and planted to blend with the surrounding natural habitat, wildlife crossings have more recently taken off in North America. Banff National Park is cut through by the bustling Trans-Canada Highway, spelling mortal danger for the bears, elk, moose and dozens of over mammals around. Between 1996 and 2013, park officials built six wildlife overpasses and 38 underpasses, which have supported more than 140,000 documented wildlife crossings. In the U.S., Montana, Washington, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, and other states now have bridges and tunnels for their own endemic species. In Los Angeles last summer, the famed mountain lion P-22 ignited talks of building a crossing over one of the most jam-packed freeways in the country.

Special pathways aren’t complete solutions to protecting animals from the threats of human development, however. Oslo’s “bee highway,” for one, isn’t nearly enough, from a government-policy standpoint, to combat the severe decline of pollinators, as Norwegian scientists have pointed out. (Worldwide, hundreds of species are in danger of extinction, leaving the human food supply increasingly vulnerable.) Long-term land-use and agricultural plans—including limiting the use of pesticides and restoring large swathes of habitat—are critical to truly help humanity’s embattled buzzing friends.

But wildlife crossings have been proven to reduce road fatalities at a significant rate. Spanning some of the world’s busiest highways, they are striking reminders of how human structures can break apart natural habitats—and how they can rebuild them.

Below are a few of our favorite crossings (and one sanctuary) from around the world.

A deer uses the new Gold Creek under-crossing in Snoqualmie Pass, Washington, on July 6, 2014. (REUTERS/Washington State Department of Transportation)
A Monarch butterfly flies through the El Rosario butterfly sanctuary on a mountain in the Mexican state of Michoacan on November 27, 2013. (REUTERS/Edgard Garrido)
A wildlife crossing constructed over pipelines at Canadian Natural Resources Limited's (CNRL) Primrose Lake oil sands project. (REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber)
Trans-Canada Highway wildlife overpass in Banff National Park. (Qyd via CC License)
A bobcat passes through an underground pipe in Los Angeles’ Santa Monica Mountains. (NPS)
A wildlife underpass in Florida. (Lamiot via CC License)
An overpass in the Netherlands. (Shutterstock/Pix-xl)
A 2010 rendering of a proposed wildlife crossing over Denver’s I-70. (HTNB with MVVA Inc.)
A 2010 rendering of a proposed wildlife crossing over Denver’s I-70. (The Olin Studio)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    A Horrifying Glimpse Into Your Dystopian Future Transit Commute

    A comic artist’s take on what the future of transportation might really feel like.

  2. a photo of the Maryland Renaissance Festival
    Life

    The Utopian Vision That Explains Renaissance Fairs

    What’s behind the enduring popularity of all these medieval-themed living-history fairs?

  3. A cyclist rides on the bike lane in the Mid Market neighborhood during Bike to Work Day in San Francisco,
    Perspective

    Why We Need to Dream Bigger Than Bike Lanes

    In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

  4. Two men look over city plans at a desk in an office.
    Equity

    The Doomed 1970s Plan to Desegregate New York’s Suburbs

    Ed Logue was a powerful agent of urban renewal in New Haven, Boston, and New York City. But his plan to build low-income housing in suburbia came to nought.

  5. An old apartment building and empty lot and new modern construction
    Equity

    Will Presidential Candidates’ Plans to Address Redlining Work?

    Housing plans by Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, and Pete Buttigieg intend redress for racist redlining housing practices, but who will actually benefit?

×