The citation was for “Gross Violation of Physical Laws.”

There must be a German traffic officer out there with either no sense of humor or an excellent one, because this weirdly bent truck—an obvious work of public artjust got a parking ticket.

Austrian artist Erwin Wurm built the surreal auto for the Center for Art and Media to celebrate the anniversary of the city of Karlsruhe. He perhaps should’ve included a disabled license plate, because while the truck’s front wheels are fine, the rear ones are braced vertically against a wall in what’s clearly a no-parking area. As clever as it’d be, the 30-euro ticket is not part of the sculpture. On Friday, the arts center bemoaned on Facebook “it’s a real ticket, which would be payable by [us].”

However, it looks like the ticket might not need be contested. Yesterday, KA-News reported city officials conspired to issue the citation for laughs (this is via Google Translate):

"This was meant by the colleagues from the outset as a joke," said a city spokesperson…. The clerk's office was informed of the action….

[An arts center] spokeswoman said, however appreciatively: “We think it’s great if the fine men of this city think for themselves artistically.”

No word yet if a similarly parked car in London has incurred any violations.

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