The walkable sculpture extends more than 100 feet over a bay.

Aarhus/Billeder

Rejoice, fans of aimless pacing: Denmark has debuted a ridiculous “bridge” you can walk for eternity without actually getting anywhere.

The “Infinite Bridge” was built by Gjøde & Povlsgaard Arkitekter for the “Sculpture by the Sea” festival in Aarhus, supposedly the “biggest and most unique outdoor sculpture exhibition” in the country. Measuring about 200 feet in diameter, the circular span stands mostly over the azure waters of the bay. It is sited above a (now-demolished) jetty once popular with the locals, say the architects, and somehow references the city’s history as a steamship port.

Designboom explains more:

as if walking on water, those traversing the circumference of “the infinite bridge” encounter the surrounding landscape from a variety of angles and orientations. the unparalleled vantage point, height and depth above the water offer a panoramic view otherwise unable to be experienced and enjoyed. “from the infinite bridge it is possible to experience the city and the bay as an endless panoramic composition,” the team at gjøde & povlsgaard architects describe. “visitors get the opportunity to take time to immerse in nature and contemplate it from new, usually inaccessible spots.”

When the tide is right, folks can dangle their toes in the water—or just jump in, as the curious dock has no railing whatsoever. Here are a few more shots, and for other sculptures in the fest, go here.

Aarhus/Billeder
Danish TM
Peter Hastrup Jensen
Aarhus/Billeder

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    Why Asian Countries Have Succeeded in Flattening the Curve

    To help flatten the curve in the Covid-19 outbreak, officials at all levels of government are asking people to stay home. Here's what’s worked, and what hasn't.

  2. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

  3. photo: a bicycle rider wearing a mask in London
    Coronavirus

    In a Global Health Emergency, the Bicycle Shines

    As the coronavirus crisis forces changes in transportation, some cities are building bike lanes and protecting cycling shops. Here’s why that makes sense.

  4. Equity

    The Problem With a Coronavirus Rent Strike

    Because of coronavirus, millions of tenants won’t be able to write rent checks. But calls for a rent holiday often ignore the longer-term economic effects.

  5. photo: a For Rent sign in a window in San Francisco.
    Coronavirus

    Do Landlords Deserve a Coronavirus Bailout, Too?

    Some renters and homeowners are getting financial assistance during the economic disruption from the coronavirus pandemic. What about landlords?

×