The walkable sculpture extends more than 100 feet over a bay.

Aarhus/Billeder

Rejoice, fans of aimless pacing: Denmark has debuted a ridiculous “bridge” you can walk for eternity without actually getting anywhere.

The “Infinite Bridge” was built by Gjøde & Povlsgaard Arkitekter for the “Sculpture by the Sea” festival in Aarhus, supposedly the “biggest and most unique outdoor sculpture exhibition” in the country. Measuring about 200 feet in diameter, the circular span stands mostly over the azure waters of the bay. It is sited above a (now-demolished) jetty once popular with the locals, say the architects, and somehow references the city’s history as a steamship port.

Designboom explains more:

as if walking on water, those traversing the circumference of “the infinite bridge” encounter the surrounding landscape from a variety of angles and orientations. the unparalleled vantage point, height and depth above the water offer a panoramic view otherwise unable to be experienced and enjoyed. “from the infinite bridge it is possible to experience the city and the bay as an endless panoramic composition,” the team at gjøde & povlsgaard architects describe. “visitors get the opportunity to take time to immerse in nature and contemplate it from new, usually inaccessible spots.”

When the tide is right, folks can dangle their toes in the water—or just jump in, as the curious dock has no railing whatsoever. Here are a few more shots, and for other sculptures in the fest, go here.

Aarhus/Billeder
Danish TM
Peter Hastrup Jensen
Aarhus/Billeder

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