An artist created the immense, realistic candies using “anamorphic distortion.”

A photo posted by Leon Keer (@leonkeer) on

Little gummy bears are squishy and cute. Blown up to immense proportions, they become disturbing—carnival-colored grizzlies threatening to topple over and absorb a bystander, amoeba-style, into their gelatinous bodies.

The specter of sofa-sized gummies loomed at the recent Malta Street Art Festival, which brought more than two-dozen urban creatives to paint stuff like a freakish eye, a phantom in a box, and, uh, Gollum. The Netherlands’ Leon Keer executed the faux candy using chalk and a technique he calls “anamorphic distortion.” From ground level they look like indistinct blobs, but from 100 feet up they seem three-dimensional, prime for slapping and watching the sweet protoplasm jiggle.

In a dark twist, what we might be looking at is a homicide scene. Keer describes the artwork this way: “Gummy bears gather around their just-deceased green friend.” Arriving in Malta next: a swarm of hungry, barge-long ants?

A photo posted by Leon Keer (@leonkeer) on

A photo posted by Leon Keer (@leonkeer) on

Another great shot of Leon Keers masterpiece 3d street art by Leon Keer

Posted by Malta street art festival on Wednesday, July 29, 2015

H/t Street Art Utopia​

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