Alfredo Adan Roses/Instagram

The fist-shaped crosswalk activator begs you to give it some love.

Want to cross the street with authority? Try using the “Walkbump,” a crosswalk button you activate by pounding it with your meaty fist.

Designer Alfredo Adan Roses made silicon molds of his hand and recently epoxied them to crosswalk poles around Los Angeles. To judge from video footage, people were quick to bond with the artificial fists, knocking them righteously as if they’d just downed a Jager bomb. (Whether or not the buttons actually do anything is another question.)

“Crossing the street at the crosswalk has now become a fun thing to do,” writes Roses.

The municipal worker who has to chip the fists out of their cement-hard bonds would probably disagree. But still, credit goes to the designer for giving a rote action some bro-worthy satisfaction—and keeping germy fingertips off the walk button, to boot.

(For those curious about the fists’ construction, see the making-of video.)

H/t Booooooom

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. MapLab

    Introducing MapLab

    A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

  4. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.

  5. The Kunsthaus in Graz, Austria.
    Design

    The Prophetic Side of Archigram

    It’s easy to see the controversial group’s influence in left field architecture from High-Tech to Blobism 50 years later, but it’s easier still to see it in emerging technologies and the way we interact with them.