SFAC/Jorge Pardo

San Francisco wants to build three of these 20-foot totems, presumably for intergalactic communication.

When San Francisco’s Van Ness Corridor Transit Improvement Project is finished around 2019, it will provide quicker and safer commutes for an estimated 60,000 people each day. It will also allow folks who wear tinfoil brain-wave protectors and listen to Alex Jones a chance to try to phone Zirbulon 7 thanks to public art shaped like immense alien call-posts.

The three proposed “lighting sculptures,” designed by artist and 2010 MacArthur Fellow Jorge Pardo, would stand an intimidating 20 feet tall and glow with a variety of internal lights. Despite all evidence to the contrary, Pardo says in a statement they’re terrestrial and meant to invoke California’s majestic trees:

the work is an urban coastal redwood……it is made of steel, light and weather…..it is young not old….it comes out of the concrete…not the soil….it does not grow…..its purpose is to orient and remind ….maybe of the past….maybe the present…..it is an urban machine…

The city will hold a public meeting in October to chat about the totems, which are planned for three new rapid-transit bus stations. Locals should head over to debate what questions we send the ETs first: “How can we end war forever?,” maybe, or “Why is Trump?”

SFAC/Jorge Pardo

H/t Hoodline

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