NL Studio

They say power naps are good for productivity, right?

Here’s a fun fact: When you fall asleep at your desk, it’s still considered working because the nearness to your station forces your brain to problem-solve while you dream.

Or so you can lie to yourself when slipping into the cozy confines of the “1.6 S.M. of Life Desk,” a stylish workspace that breaks down into a bed. Named for its dimensions—2 by 0.8 meters—the desk is meant to give a spot of relief for weary drones, according to NL Studio in Koropi, Greece.

The firm’s Athanasia Leivaditou conceived of the multipurpose furniture while studying and working in busy, cramped New York. NL Studio explains more at Archilovers:

The main concept was to comment on the fact that many times our lives are “shrinking” in order to fit into the confined space of our office. Eventually, I realized that each civilization may have a very different perception of things depending on its social context. For example, this desk could be used for a siesta or for a few hours of sleep at night on those days when someone struggles to meet deadlines.

Made from lacquered wood, metal, and white leather, the desk is a prototype and not available for retail. However, study these pictures of it collapsing and you might be able to build your own. Perhaps you’ll want to include side walls, though, so if you pull a Costanza at work the boss won’t notice and throw cold coffee on you.

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