Max Siedentopf

Max Siedentopf is “improving” cars in the depth of night, one paper spoiler at a time.

Imagine the delight in finding that, overnight, your rusty beater had changed into a kick-ass sports car. That’s not exactly what Max Siedentopf is doing, but his heart’s in the right place: Under the cover of darkness, he’s accessorizing random vehicles in Amsterdam with cardboard spoilers, grills, and Mad Max-style superchargers.

“We live in a time where individuality, self-expression, and status are at an all-time peak. We want to personalize everything to be unique,” emails Siedentopf, who’s 24. “However, for some reason the individualization of one’s car has drastically decreased over the past few years. Resultant out of this realization, I tried to think of a way to make the most ordinary cars for just a few euros into their own supercar.”

The resulting endeavor, captured in the photo series “Slapdash Supercars,” has had cars around Amsterdam festooned with cartoonish parts that look taped together in a grade-school crafting exercise. The owners are absent from the pictures, as Siedentopf typically works from 4:30 to 5:30 a.m. But he hopes the “improvements” bring a smile to their faces, at least until they have to rip off the cardboard because the neighbors keep ragging on their ratchet rides. “[I]t’s not the real deal, but I hope they appreciate the effort and see the lighter side of it,” he says.

For folks who actually do like these modified autos, you can get an idea for a really souped-out version by checking out this guy’s cardboard Ferrari.

H/t Urbanshit

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  2. Perspective

    Coronavirus Reveals Transit’s True Mission

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  3. Coronavirus

    The Coronavirus Class Divide in Cities

    Places like New York, Miami and Las Vegas have a higher share of the workforce in jobs with close proximity to others, putting them at greater Covid-19 risk.

  4. Traffic-free Times Square in New York City
    Maps

    Mapping How Cities Are Reclaiming Street Space

    To help get essential workers around, cities are revising traffic patterns, suspending public transit fares, and making more room for bikes and pedestrians.

  5. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

×