There’s a headless horseman standing in a pumpkin-spice blood puddle in France.

It may always be summer on Google Earth: sky cloudless, grass green, fields abundant. But on Google Street View, it is most definitely Halloween.

Keir Clarke, chronicler of all things mappy, has created a special tour of the spookiest (OK, cheesy-spookiest) corners of the Google-trawled globe. Tip-toe through these scenes of terror using the arrows in the upper right hand corner, and explore them (if you dare!) with the usual Street View buttons. Below is a sample of Clarke’s haunts, plus a few other classic bizarro tableaus from the street-mapping giant.

And if you prefer your nightmares in two dimensions, don’t forget the most disturbing images Google Maps has made yet.

Worst warehouse party ever

(Google Street View)

Spectres of death

(Google Street View)

Parade of the missing

(Google Street View)

Pumpkin-spice blood puddle

(Google Street View)

The AIIEEES!!! have it

(Google Street View)

Seriously, don’t feed the birds

(Google Street View)

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