Pierre Ciret

A French redesign of a train station would put in bookshelves, grass, and palm trees.

Imagine digesting your favorite author under bright, blue skies and bushy palm trees. Now imagine doing it while you’re still inside the library—that’s the vision of Pierre Ciret’s soothing garden for books in Nice, France.

The interior designer whipped up the bucolic bibliotheca as a conceptual revamping of a train station on Avenue Thiers. He explains the experiment on Archilovers (via Google Translate):

The atmosphere of the building will be consistent with that already present. It will be fun, playing with the openings on the outer life, punctuated by sunshine of the building, which will deliver an attractive atmosphere.

The charm of iron and glass will be kept current and will complement the presence of various colors and materials so that everyone can make the most of the place. Due to the large openings, problems with glare, heat and discomfort due to bad light domesticated will be solved.

Ciret’s vision includes a summery ceiling of curved glass, rustic hardwood floods, and a central garden of grass and palms bisected with a boardwalk. Bookshelves blend in almost like camouflage, allowing the natural beauty of plants and sunbeams to infuse the space. The only thing missing, perhaps, are hammocks and a beer garden—although that might turn this “green library” into a “green bedchamber.” Take a look:

Pierre Ciret

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