Warning: Very slightly NSFW.

True architecture lovers should feel some relief: There are others like you out there. The Italian architectural illustrator Federico Babina’s new series is called “Archisutra” because it depicts beautiful buildings getting themselves into some...interesting situations.

“Sex City” (Federico Babina)

Yes, those are buildings spicing up their sex lives, much like the humans shown in the ancient Indian Hindu classic the Kama Sutra.

“Architecture can be sexy, erotic, and even pornographic,” Babina told CityLab via email. “Many architectural constructions lean, voluntarily or involuntarily, on metaphoric values and on sexual symbolism.”

“Orgytecture” (Federico Babina)
“Axo” (Federico Babina)

Babina would be far from the first to observe that much architecture is imbued with a certain sexiness. He cites the Swiss architect Bernard Tschumi, who famously asserted that “architecture is the ultimate erotic act.”

The series, Babina writes, is “one way to explore not only the functional component of architecture, but also its capacity [for] communication.”

“Archisutra” (Federico Babina)
“Archisutra No. 1” (Federico Babina)

Prints, $25 at Society6.

H/t Dezeen Magazine

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