Pop-up pool zumba? Knight Foundation

The Knight Foundation is inviting literally anyone to come up with the best project ideas for enhancing civic life.

“Man, if only this city had better parks, or more public pools, or more benches.” If you’ve ever caught yourself mentally playing mayor or city architect, this is your chance.

Starting today, (October 1), the Knight Foundation is inviting anyone—architects, artists, designers, activists, hackers, and dabblers of all kind—to propose their best ideas for their Cities Challenge competition.

The private U.S.-based nonprofit has set aside $5 million to fund projects that enhance civic life in 26 U.S. cities. Now on its second year, the Cities Challenge is open to any design team in the world, and aims at funding wildly imaginative new ideas. “We’re particularly interested in ideas that knit people across the economic divide,” says Carol Coletta, who oversees the program.

Among last year’s 32 winning ideas are clearer, sexier signs for polling stations in Philadelphia, a floating sustainable farm on a Miami barge, and a project that pairs barbers with landscape contractors to mow and manicure overgrown lots in Detroit.

Next Stop: Democracy! The Voting Signage Project(Knight Foundation)

Of course, it’s not just about having good ideas. “If you have an idea, we’ll also expect you to execute it,” explains Coletta to us.

The deadline for the Knight Foundation Cities Challenge is October 27, 12 pm EST.

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

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