And what does it all mean?

You tell me.

The piece is OY/YO by Deborah Kass. It is located in Brooklyn Bridge Park and it is the subject of a story in The New York Times. It is an homage to OOF, a 1962 painting by by Ed Ruscha, one of the most California painters you could name. But OY/YO is also about as New York as it gets.

Because it says “Oy.”

A photo posted by @sharoncounts on

Or does it say “Yo”? Yeah, it says “Yo.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

No, I had it right the first time: “Oy.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

Definitely “Oy.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

How is it even a question?

A photo posted by Two Trees (@twotreesny) on

Case closed.

A photo posted by @nyc.today on

But wait a sec.

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

WAIT A SECOND.

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

You’ve got a limited time to decide for yourself. The piece will only be in Brooklyn Bridge Park until August. Don't expect it to disappear after that, though. It's got staying power, a familiar (maybe even derivative) spirit of polite public provocation along the lines of Robert Indiana's 1966–69 Love. (Not to be confused with Evol.)

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

Hang on! OY/YO reads as “Oy” if you’re heading from Brooklyn to Manhattan and “Yo” if you’re going from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Now I get it. Oof.

A photo posted by @allieesslinger on

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