And what does it all mean?

You tell me.

The piece is OY/YO by Deborah Kass. It is located in Brooklyn Bridge Park and it is the subject of a story in The New York Times. It is an homage to OOF, a 1962 painting by by Ed Ruscha, one of the most California painters you could name. But OY/YO is also about as New York as it gets.

Because it says “Oy.”

A photo posted by @sharoncounts on

Or does it say “Yo”? Yeah, it says “Yo.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

No, I had it right the first time: “Oy.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

Definitely “Oy.”

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

How is it even a question?

A photo posted by Two Trees (@twotreesny) on

Case closed.

A photo posted by @nyc.today on

But wait a sec.

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

WAIT A SECOND.

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

You’ve got a limited time to decide for yourself. The piece will only be in Brooklyn Bridge Park until August. Don't expect it to disappear after that, though. It's got staying power, a familiar (maybe even derivative) spirit of polite public provocation along the lines of Robert Indiana's 1966–69 Love. (Not to be confused with Evol.)

A photo posted by Deborah Kass (@debkass) on

Hang on! OY/YO reads as “Oy” if you’re heading from Brooklyn to Manhattan and “Yo” if you’re going from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Now I get it. Oof.

A photo posted by @allieesslinger on

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. A map of Minneapolis from the late 19th century.
    Maps

    When Minneapolis Segregated

    In the early 1900s, racial housing covenants in the Minnesota city blocked home sales to minorities, establishing patterns of inequality that persist today.

  3. A map of population density in Tokyo, circa 1926.
    Maps

    How to Detect the Distortions of Maps

    All maps have biases. A new online exhibit explores the history of map distortions, from intentional propaganda to basic data literacy.

  4. A hawk perches on a tree in the ramble area of Central Park in New York.
    Equity

    The Toxic Intersection of Racism and Public Space

    For black men like Christian Cooper, the threat of a call to police casts a cloud of fear over parks and public spaces that others associate with safety.

  5. Maps

    Your Maps of Life Under Lockdown

    Stressful commutes, unexpected routines, and emergent wildlife appear in your homemade maps of life during the coronavirus pandemic.

×