“The Passenger” is an installation by Arne Quinze and not, as you might think, a gorgeous tornado disaster.

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

Walk along the Rue de Nimy in Mons, Belgium, and you might think an EF-5 tornado just ripped through a Home Depot. Looming above the street is an insane structure of wooden boards, whose improbable angles, gaping holes, and kaleidoscopic colors seem to defy both logic and gravity.

The eviscerated shipwreck-looking installation, titled “The Passenger,” is the work of Belgian conceptual artist Arne Quinze, who when not making public space more surreal in Europe dabbles in flammable, monumental Burning Man architecture. About this latest project, which measures 141 feet long and 52 feet high, Quinze writes (forgive the grammar):

“The Passenger” symbolises the flow of people and their cultural evolution occupying the Rue de Nimy’s since its origine in the 13th century. Functioning as the main entrance toward the Grand Place of Mons. One of the most important commercial trading center to the province of Hainaut during Middle Ages. With “The Passenger“ Arne Quinze focuses on the historical importance of Rue de Nimy. A cultural passage who influenced all layers of its society through the years. Boosting historie and memories, assessments and creativity during the next 4 years. “The Passenger” will provoke reaction and intervene in the daily life of passersby. Pushing dialogue and open the debate on contemporary urbanization.

This is actually a rebirth of the impressive installation—he first built “The Passenger” in Mons last winter, when it made unfortunate headlines for partially collapsing. Nobody was injured, and here’s hoping that won’t happen again this year.

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

A photo posted by Arne Quinze (@arnequinze) on

H/t StreetArtNews

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  2. A crowded street outside in Boston
    Life

    Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

    A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

  3. A polar-bear cub sits on a rock outcropping as a crowd looks on in the background.
    Design

    What Zoo Design Reveals About Human Attitudes to Nature

    Author Natascha Meuser describes zoo architecture as a “masquerade” that borrows from museums, prisons, and theaters.

  4. A man stands next to an electric scooter
    Transportation

    Why Electric Scooters Companies Are Getting Serious About Safety

    Lime has joined rival Bird in establishing a safety advisory board tasked with helping the e-scooter industry shape local regulations—and shake its risky reputation.

  5. Environment

    When an Earthquake Followed a Flood, This Ancient City Disappeared Forever

    Two millennia ago, an earthquake liquified the ground beneath an Egyptian port—a fate that could await other cities as sea levels rise.

×