For when you need ridiculous quantities of suds in a hurry.

In Belgien gibt es Bierautomaten, an denen man Kisten kaufen kann. Jetzt noch n Frikadellenautomaten und der Einzelhandel kann zumachen!

Posted by Jung von Mett on Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Some foreigners go nuts learning that Japan has vending machines that dispense cans of beer. Well, Belgium just made that technology look positively quaint with this drop-you-under-the-table-quick contraption: a vending machine that sells entire crates of beer.

The mighty invention, located in West Flanders, is the first of its kind in the world, according to Het Nieuwsblad. It’s a pilot project from brewing giant AB InBev, thus its loads of Jupiler beer, a popular Belgian brew made partly with corn. It was fabricated in Italy and has some sort of ID-checking system to prevent fun-loving teens from piling up around it, snowdrift-like, in intoxicated reverie.

An AB InBev spokeswomen told Het Nieuwsblad (and this is via Google Translate) the machine is meant to serve a “rising consumer demand for chilled beer at any time of the day and the night.” Here’s hoping they place one of those whole-pizza vending machines next to it, to cater to the inevitable late-night demand for munchies.

H/t Urbanshit

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