Vicki DaSilva

Vicki DaSilva used light graffiti to execute this elegant-looking insult.

Donald Trump probably doesn’t know it, but his namesake building in Manhattan has been branded with the word “Loser.”

Artist Vicki DaSilva used the most ephemeral of graffiti media, light, to draw the GOP presidential candidate’s favorite insult at the entrance of 40 Wall Street. The process took all of 13 seconds and left behind no trace, except for this nice footage captured by videographer Owen Crowley.

Light painting has been around for some time—Picasso sketched centaurs with a small electric torch in the 1940s—but DaSilva gets credit for her impressive hand-eye coordination and neat, cursive letters. Here’s hoping she tackles Trump’s other put-downs soon, including “clown,” “wacko,” and “a mess.”

H/t Brooklyn Street Art

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