Andre Muniz Gonzaga

Exploring the freaky, anthropomorphic street art of Brazil’s Andre Muniz Gonzaga.

If you’re ever walking down an empty street and feel eyes on your back, it might not just be paranoia. Many of Brazil’s public surfaces have grown creepy peepers—as well as twisted maws and catlike noses—thanks to the bizarre interventions of Andre Muniz Gonzaga.

The artist, who goes by Dalata, has spent years spicing up his native country as well as many other places with his freaky, anthropomorphic style. He often incorporates parts of the urban environment, using a hole in the wall to create a mouth or a garbage bag for wrinkled skin. The technique gives a layer of camouflage to his works; you might have to stare hard before registering that, yes, that rock really is staring back at you.

You can find the artist’s work cataloged on Facebook, Flickr, and Instagram. Here are some selections both recent and old, mainly from Brazil and Senegal:

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