Kyung Roh

The idea is to make finding a space to play ball in overcrowded Seoul a little easier.

In a city so dense there are two-month wait lists for tennis and basketball courts, a Seoul architecture firm has designed what it hopes is a solution: a foldable, transportable sports facility. Ji Hyun Park and his firm B.U.S. Architecture have come up with the “Undefined Playground.” Sides of the 12-foot-tall structure correspond to different games: soccer, tennis, basketball, and discus throw.

(Kyung Roh)

Other features, such as a hammock—for those who need a rest or perhaps the neighborhood bookworm—and a space that can be used as a ticket booth, snack bar, or sporting goods rental office are also built in.

When folded, players can access a small soccer goalpost, three basketball hoops, targets for the discus throw, a wall against which to hit a tennis ball, and the ticket booth/snack bar/rental office. When unfolded, a semicircle soccer field also appears, as does the space for setting up the hammock.

(Kyung Roh)

Park told Wired one of the ideas behind the design is to foster the kind of spontaneous play he remembers enjoying as a child—and that is now harder to do in the congested capital. “When I was young,” he said, “anywhere in the neighborhood would become our playground, as long as we had a ball.”

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a rendering of the moon village with a view of Earth
    Design

    Designing the First Full-Time Human Habitat on the Moon

    SOM, in partnership with the ESA and MIT, wants to accommodate research and maybe even tourism on the moon.

  2. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  3. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  4. A photo of couples dancing in a park.
    Life

    The Geography of Online Dating

    When looking for love, most people don’t look far from home. That's what a big-data analysis of interactions on a dating site revealed.

  5. South Lake Union streetcar with an advertisement for Amazon passes by an Amazon office building.
    Equity

    Amazon’s Slow Retreat From Seattle

    Amazon has long fancied itself an urban enterprise. Is its pivot to smaller communities a way to avoid messy politics?